What have they become? Career evolutions after graduating in technical communication at Université de Paris

As part of the theme for the 9th International Conference on Technical Communication: Evolutions of the Discipline, we have ctarried out a short study to find out what technical communication graduates had become. Here are the insights we gathered from this study.

The study

A survey was sent to alumni of Master and License Pro alumni at Université de Paris. We received:

  • 15 responses from License alumni
  • 60 responses from Master alumni

We received more responses from alumni who had recently graduated:

  • 38 graduated between 2020 and 2015 (within 5 years)
  • 23 graduated between 2014 and 2007 (within 10 years)
  • 14 graduated in or before 2006 (within 15 years)

The survey ran throughout January 2021 and was communicated to Université de Paris alumni through the alumni association ATCDIL, and through LinkedIn groups.

What have they become?

We have grouped job titles into 6 categories:

  • Data: Business analyst
  • Direction: Manager, Director, Product manager, Product owner, VP, CEO
  • Design: Technical architect, Learning Experience designer, Curriculum architect, Content designer, UX writer, Instructional designer
  • Development: Copywriter, Scientific writer, Technical writer, Translator, Proposal writer
  • Delivery: Content manager, Documentation engineer, Project manager
  • Dialogue: Consultant, Knowledge manager, Support engineer

The categories apply across business functions, such as documentation, training and digital learning, change management, operations, technical support, or marketing.

The following chart shows the percentage of respondants for each job title within 5, 10, and 15 years or more after graduation.

Only 2 respondants took a job outside of the technical communication field after graduation, and were not included in this chart.

Evolution of tech comm job titles

We can see that within 10 years, jobs become more diverse, and then consolidate into leadership roles within 15 years and more. A quarter of alumi still hold Development roles after 15 years.

Initial skills applied in current position

We asked participants to list the skills that they had acquired during their training at Université de Paris, which they were still applying in their current position.

Within 5 years, top initial skills are:

  • Writing
  • Website development
  • Information architecture

Within 10 years:

  • Writing is by far the top skill that prevails above all others.

Within 15 years:

  • Writing
  • Website development

Initial skills

Skills acquired since initial position

We asked survey participants to list any additional training they followed after landing their first job.

Added skills

It seems like people currently in Direction roles are the ones who have acquired most skills since their initial training, followed by people in Development roles.

New skills to acquire in current position

We asked survey participants to list any new skills they thought they needed to acquire in their current position.

Within 5 years:

  • Programming languages
  • Video production
  • Domain knowledge

Within 10 years:

  • Domain knowledge
  • Project management
  • Business management, customer relations
  • UX Design

Within 15 years:

  • Content management (XML, CMS, LMS)
  • Management
  • Change management

New skills

Evolutions of the discipline

We asked survey participants to share their thoughts about the future of technical communication as a discipline. They listed the following points:

More varied media formats, more tools

Only evolution possible is to move to a management position

Responsibilities become more varied (jack-of-all trades)

APIs and docs as code, Git

Data analysis, to elaborate a strategy based on facts

Agile methodologies (Scrum) and Design Thinking

Evolution towards roles in quality testing, editing, or project management

More user centricity : UX design and content strategy

AI-generated text involves a move towards domains where human interaction remains crucial (education, health, Human Resources, crafts…)

Better recognition of the profession, improvements in tools for user research and information architecture

Process automation coupled with content management

More online training

 

 

9th International Conference on Technical Communication: Thank you!

It’s a wrap! This year’s International Conference on Technical Communication was a special one, as it was the first time we were holding it online. From this constraint came a fantastic opportunity, with an amazing panel of speakers, great interaction between attendees worldwide, and insightful discussions about evolutions of the discipline.

A lot of fun was had by all at the event, and to keep the momentum going here are the much awaited conference takeways:

Developing a network for professional development when STC or other organizations aren’t available

It’s important to have conversations with tech comm practitioners in different contexts/spaces. We can learn so much from each other that way

Listening to what’s happening in Europe in terms of research and industry was great!

Updating a layer instead of adding a layer = minimalism well defined

Rething what you’re going to create and design it in a smart way.

Alexandre’s notion of recycling.

It is great to bring together our research findings

I liked the concept of information literacy. We may not think of it whenever we’re crafting content.

How will technical communication careers evolve?

During a networking session at the 9th International Conference on Technical Communication: Evolutions of the Discipline, we asked attendees to discuss how technical communication careers will evolve. This is what they said.

Dissolution: a core competency for many different careers

Product Manager, Consulting (e.g. tooling), support positions, UX positions, Education, Management and Leadership

More e-learning

Technical writing becomes a core competency

Tech Writing is design and the positions are absorbed by design groups

The careers may become even more multifaceted, involving UX, customer-support.

Or technical communication may become an extra skill for engineers, in a cost-cutting, systemic crisis context.

Testing (product, data…?)

Consolidation: acknowlegement as a competitive advantage

More direct-to-consumer communication (back and forth commenting/updating)

Better acknowledgment of the profession among other teams

It will be more about the way we interact with the user, the techniques we’re using to help the end-users assimilate content just-in-times support.

Tech wirting is a competitive advantage

More collaboration with other disciplines like marketing and development

More collaboration and integration

Technical writing will become more present in all companies, mostly because data is increasingly easy to handle and also because people are specializing a lot, so I don’t think an engineer could craft a better job than a technical writer (but that’s just my point of view).

Apocalypse: the bots take over

Writing for bots

Worst case scenario : a software is designed to enable technical data extraction. Engineers and technicians are trained to use it. Technical communicators disappear per se, superseded by low-cost technical communication made by outsiders: it follows the same fate as translation.

Technical communication apocalypse

We still need to train the robots

We’ll be writing the human conversations and figuring out tools that we’ll need to write for machine learning applications and automation

Extension: fact-checking for a society in need of information literacy

Pam and Alexandre brought up something really interesting on how TW could help providing information to people who are less at ease with traditional media

Checking the validity of data as a profession

Specialization: domain-specific branches

Supervising of Distributed contributors around the world (increase)

Continuing need for domain-specific writing skills – for developers, for healthcare etc

What brings technical communicators together?

During a networking session at the 9th International Conference on Technical Communication: Evolutions of the Discipline, we asked attendees to discuss what brings technical communicators together. This is what they said.

Community

The struggle ! 😉

Joining professional organizations such as the STC.

Team cohesiveness

Newsletters, meetings

A shared sense of community as we are a reduced group of professionals

Culture of humanities

Background

Many of us come from different backgrounds such as language, art, archeology. Surprisingly few have engineering or technical backgrounds.

Love for languages

Interest in words

Common desire for understanding and sharing

Knowing how to structure ideas

Love for knowledge, desire to share knowledge/access info

Love of communication

Love for knowledge

Tech writers share the same goal, to bring the information in a way that is accesible to certain audiences.

Technical writers are some sort of teachers as we have to convey info

“All of us share the same goal: to simplify the complex matters – adapt to the audience – being accessible/understandable”

Empathy, caring for others

User-centric approach

Empathy

Tools and techniques

Using different kinds of technology to communicate with our end-users,

Curiosity and continuous learning

Update and progress made in technical communication

Great to share ideas and compare the ways of working with non-writers (in my case, software developers & engineers).

Professional Weaknesses and Strengths sharing

To discuss new and emerging trends

Meta reflections, continuous improvement, interest for processes and optimization

Mediation

Technical communicators stand at the intersection between an object/a product/content and the users. They’re some sort of “unifying mediators”/translators between various worlds/moderators or translators of different cultures, popularizing bribes of info, making them accessible to different audiences by adapting your writing.

Bringing people together: helping collaboration, understanding, and knowledge sharing

Being generalists in a specialized world

We also feel the need to see a broader perspective of communication of information

 

 

9th International Conference on Technical Communication: Evolutions of the Discipline

Evolution of the technical communication discipline

From device documentation to digital training, from UX writing to video tutorials, technical communication is a discipline that covers varied activities. It seems like a single job title will never cover every facet of the profession.
During the next 9th International Conference on technical communication, we will explore the job market, training curricula and evolutions of the trade:

  • The place taken by technical communication within a organisation with the typically associated business: Product, support, marketing, HR…
  • The evolution of skills, methods and tools.
  • The challenge of technical communication training curricula to cover varied needs.
  • The possible career paths in technical communications.

Friday 29 January 2021, from 10.00 – 17.00 Paris Time (UTC+1)

Program

10.00 – 10.10

Introduction

Patricia Minacori and Marie Girard

10.10 – 10.40

Presentation of research projects [PDF]

Master’s Students In Technical Communication, Université de Paris

10.40 – 11.10

Evolution of the profession [PDF]

Elisabeth Closs, Karlsruhe University,  Yvonne Cleary, Limerick University

  • For anyone who would like to join the university network, please email Yvonne Cleary (yvonne.cleary (at) ul.ie) who will add you to the mailing list.
11.10 – 11.40
DITA Molière: A community to support the growing adoption of DITA standard in France [PDF]

Dominique Trouche, WhP

Companies Using DITA

11.40 – 12.30

Networking breakout sessions: What brings technical communicators together?

12.30 – 13.30

Lunch break

13.30 – 14.00

Examining the value of technical communication graduate degrees in non-academic professions [PDF]

Meghalee Das, Texas Tech University, Samantha Casertano, John McClellan, Texas State University

14.00 – 14.30

Information architecture: which skills, roles, and careers? [PDF]

François Violette, JobTeaser

14.30 – 15.00

Designing our way out of information pollution: how technical communicators are leading the shift toward an ecology of information. [PDF]

Alexandre Dias Da Silva, Consultant

15.00 – 15.30

Networking breakout sessions: How will technical communication careers evolve?

15.30 – 16.00

From tech comm to marketing: a tangled journey [PDF]

Michael Priestley, IBM

  • Beyond Silos : https://www.editions-hermann.fr/livre/9791037002754
16.00 – 16.30

Future tech comm trends – Differing opinions, and why everyone could be right [PDF]

Ellis Pratt, Cherryleaf

  • Sarah O’Keefe – Scriptorium. Scriptorium is a consummate content strategy company.
16.30 – 17.00

Community Engagement in Technical Communication Pedagogy [PDF]

Laura Gonzalez, University of Florida

Recordings will be available shortly.

8th International Conference on Technical Communication: Designing Experiences

Design d'expérience

Digital services transform our everyday experience, first through screens (websites, e-learning, online help, videos and social networks), and now through the physical world (voice assistants, augmented reality, blended learning). Technical communication has always had very strong ties with experience design. Now communication and design practices need to evolve to better support hybrid experiences across the digital and physical worlds.

Les projets de recherche en M2 Communication Technique Multilingue [PDF]

Marie Girard et les étudiants du M2 CTM

Assistants vocaux, comment puis-je vous aider? [PDF]

Maaike Coppens, Head UX design, M Creation, Paris

La réalité virtuelle au service de l’apprentissage [PDF]

Pierre Marole, Responsable partenariats, Digital and Human, Paris

Métadonnées : au service des expériences utilisateurs [PDF]

François Violette, Information Architect, ReachFive

Design responsable : concevoir pour l’avenir [PDF]

Aurélie Baton, UX Designer, IBM France

Que se passe-t-il lorsque vous mettez 50 rédacteurs techniques au sein d’une équipe de Design [PDF]

Sarah Baillot, SAP France

Quand les mots influencent le design et les interfaces [PDF]

Amandine Agic, Content Strategist, ACCOR

Camille Promérat, UX Writer, Freelance

Building UX As A Strategy for Growth [PDF]


Greta Goetz,PhD, Faculty of Philology, University of Belgrade

 

7th International Conference on Technical Communication: Transforming Knowledge (2019)

7th International Conference on Technical Communication

Technical communication aims at transforming tacit knowledge into useful and usable content. During this year’s International Conference on Technical Communication, we explored the tools, methodologies and processes that make it possible to transform internal, individual knowledge into external, standardized content.

Les projets de recherche en M2 CDMM [PDF]

Marie Girard et les étudiants du M2 CDMM

Travailler avec les experts pour construire des formations digitales (e-learning) [PDF]

Agnès Mfayokurera, Consultante – fondatrice Triptik

Capitalisation des connaissances et ingénierie pédagogique [PDF]

Nicolas Sengmany (EXT IGDOC)

What Does The Future Hold For The Technical Communication Market? [PDF]

C.J. Walker, Firehead

Knowledge Management : au secours de la transformation [PDF]

Boris Durupt Zhou Knowledge Manager et coach outils collaboratifs – Société Générale Corporate and Investment Banking (SGCIB)

Les communautés de pratiques – Maillon essentiel de la stratégie KM de l’entreprise [PDF]

Louis-Pierre Guillaume, Consultant – fondateur Amallte

Intelligence artificielle et rédaction scientifique : quels nouveaux enjeux pour la R&D des entreprises ? [PDF]

Charlie Grosman, Team Leader, Pierre Holat, Data Scientist, Richard Moutoucarpin,alternant L3 Pro redaction technique – F. Iniciativas

Transformer la connaissance ? [PDF]
Pascal Negros, Enseignant en ingénierie des connaissances, Ecole de Management, Sorbonne-Paris 1

Listen to the recordings on YouTube.

6th International Conference on Technical Communication: Life-long Learning (2018)

6th international conference speakers

This year’s international conference on technical communication was about life-long learning. We explored learning innovation in the digital era, how technical communication contributes to the learning experience, and how technical communicators can keep learning.

9h30-10h Ouverture des travaux
Patricia Minacori, Marie Girard
10h10-10h40 Les projets de recherche en M2 CDMM [PDF]

Marie Girard et les étudiants du M2 CDMM

10h40-11h10 Se reconnecter à soi-même grâce à la pédagogie alternative [PDF]

Tabea Menez, Consultante en stratégie “Modes de vie, de travail et d’apprentissage autonomes”

11h10-11h40 Classe inversée et compétences en communication technique [PDF]

Marie Girard, IBM et PAST Paris Diderot

11h40-12h10 Tech Writers Without Borders: Write. Help. Learn. Repeat. [PDF]

Stuart Culshaw, IBM

12h15-14h00 Lunch break
14h00-14h30 De l’obligation réglementaire à l’habilitation agile : une démarche à T2C, la régie des Transports de Clermont-Ferrand [PDF]
Pour T2C : Julien Jiat : Sûreté de Fonctionnement Traway
pour Atelier Numérique – Author-it : Jean-François Didier
14h30-15h00 Évolution de la documentation technique dans l’industrie – Enjeux et perspectives sur la formation [PDF]

Philippe Zingoni, NOTEHA

15h00-15h20 Break
15h20-15h50 Technical Commmunication: a two-sided coin? [PDF]

Koussay Houssine, Laetitia Naly, Axel Petit, Technical Communicators

15h50-16h10 Unconscious Learning

Marc Swanson, Technical Communicator

16h10-17h00 Discussion

Recordings:

5th International Conference on Technical Communication – Beyond Silos (2017)

Patricia Minacori, Marie Girard
Research Laboratory Clillac- Arp, EILA Department, at Paris Diderot University
Technical Writers Without Borders

5th International Conference on Technical Communication

Beyond Silos

Friday 3 February 2017, 10.00-17.00
Paris Diderot University Lecture Theater Buffon
15 rue Hélène Brion, 75013 Paris, FRANCE.

This year’s theme was about collaboration between technical documentation teams and their partners in engineering, training, support, user experience, marketing, translation, change management, and so on. Collaboration beyond silos implies tools and methodologies that support new ways of working, innovation, as well as changes in the role of technical communicators.

10h00-10h10 Opening

Patricia Minacori, Marie Girard

10h10-10h30  M2 CDMM research projects [PDF]

Marie Girard and M2 CDMM students

10h30-10h50 Connecting silos through design thinking: radical collaboration in the Wearables Research Collaboratory [PDF]

Ann Hill Duin et al, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA

10h50-11h10 Increasing student access to client information in the service learning technical communication classroom: results of three client contract strategies [PDF]

Sarah Gunning, Towson University, Baltimore, MD, USA

11h10-11h30 Creating collaborations: an interdisciplinary pedagogy for professional and technical writing students [PDF]

Rhonda Stanton and Leslie Seawright, Missouri State University, Springfield, MO, USA

11h30-12h15 Discussions
12h15-14h00 Lunch break
14h00-14h20 Intersection of technical communication and marketing genres: spanning silos through product documentation [Recording]

Scott A. Mogull, Texas State University, San Marcos, TX, USA

14h20-14h40 Breaking silos by building highly coupled cross-functional teams [PDF]

Fanny Bischoff, IBM  

14h40-15h00 Content for Industry 4.0 : content is software is content [PDF]

Ray Gallon, Transformation Society

15h00-15h20 Break
15h20-15h40 Intra-organizational communication without barriers: a case study of a technical communications team within a large organization [PDF]

Fabrizia Poli, Docunet

15h40-16h00 Les bienfaits d’une collaboration réussie  entre communicateurs techniques et traducteurs [PDF]

Vincent Bidaux

16h00-17h00 Discussion

 

4th International Conference on Technical Communication – Big data, cloud, analytics, collaboration, social networks, and remote work (2015)

Nous vous invitons au quatrième Colloque international Communication technique de plein champ de l’Université PARIS DIDEROT

4th International Conference on Technical Communication

Big data, cloud, analytics, collaboration, social networks, and remote work

Vendredi 30 janvier 2015

Université Paris Diderot, Amphi Buffon 15 rue Hélène Brion, 75013 Paris


9h30 10h00 : Accueil des intervenants et des participants

10h00 10h10 : Ouverture des travaux

10h10 10h40 : Jean Paul Bardez, Bernard Soukoff, Françoise Jouan, CRT – La communication technique : il n’y a pas que la technique

10h40 11h10 : Michael Fritz, Président Tekom Europe : The Tekom Taxonomy for Technical Communication

11h10 11h40 : Fabrice Lacroix, Antidot – Quand les utilisateurs deviennent acteurs de la communication

11h40 12h10 : Marie Girard -Choppinet, Sarah Chaoui IBM – Définir une stratégie globale du contenu à l’ère du Big Data

12H10 12h40 : Denis Florean, IBM – Big Data and Cognitive Computing: IBM Watson Analytics

12h40 14h00 : Déjeuner libre

14h00 14h30 : Guillaume Séjouné, Cloudmark – Cloud Computing: Where to start?

14h30 15h00 : Fanny Bischoff, IBM – Documenter pour le Cloud ou la livraison perpétuelle

15h00 15h30 : Sarah Baillot, SAP – KM People Heading for the Cloud at SAP

15h30 16h00 : Questions réponses : la parole est à la salle

16h00 16h30 : Présentation des projets de recherche des étudiants de Master 2 CDMM

16h30 17h00 : Forccast : Innovation pédagogique Sciences Po -Paris Diderot

17h00 : Clôture des travaux

3rd International Conference on Technical Communication – Information models and knowledge management (2013)

Patricia Minacori, le laboratoire de recherche CLILLAC-ARP, de l’Université Paris Diderot, en association avec STC France et CRT sont heureux de vous accueillir, à l’amphi Buffon, 15 rue Hélène Brion, 75013 Paris, entrée libre.

samedi 26 janvier 2013

3rd International Conference on Technical Communication

Modèles d’information et mutualisation des bases de connaissances

DITA or not DITA (les débats sont lancés !), les recherches sur les modèles d’information pour améliorer les pratiques et les outils.

Mutualiser les bases de connaissances pour répondre à des situations de complexité, créer des ontologies pour représenter les connaissances et aussi mettre en place des outils d’aide à la rédaction.

 

9h30 – 10h Accueil des intervenants et des participants
10h-10h30 Ouverture du colloque : la communication technique à l’épreuve de la complexité [PDF]

Patricia Minacori, Directrice du Département professionnalisation, Paris Diderot

10h30–11h00 Quelle stratégie adopter pour garantir l’adéquation entre contenu et modèle documentaire ?

Jérémy Dubaut, Ingénieur documentation, Liebherr-France

11h00–11h20 Les projets de recherche des étudiants du M2 CDMM

Virginie Ahrens, Technology Manager, IBM France, Professeur associé Paris Diderot

11h20-11h50 Modéliser la documentation avec DITA dans un environnement Agile

Andy McDonald, TECH’ advantage

11h50-12h20 Gestion des taxinomies dans un contexte de réutilisation des contenus [PDF]

Camille Begnis, NeoDoc

12h30-14h00 Déjeuner
14h00-14h30 Démarche et pratiques collaboratives dans le France Lab d’IBM

Virginie Ahrens, Technology Manager, IBM France, PAST Paris Diderot

14h30-15h00 Méthode de création d’ontologies [PDF]

Mariam Gawich, Université Française d’Egypte, Le Caire

15h00-15h30 Favoriser la captation et la collaboration pour construire une véritable chaîne de production documentaire.

Nolwenn Kerzreho, Componize Software, PAST Rennes II

15h30-16h00 Luna : outil d’aide à la rédaction technique

François Ruty, Luna Technology

16h-16h30 Les projets de la STC

Débats et conclusions

2nd International Conference on Technical Communication – The semantic web and user experience (2012)

Patricia Minacori, le laboratoire de recherche CLILLAC-ARP, de l’Université de Paris Diderot, en association avec STC France et CRT sont heureux de vous accueillir, à l’amphi Buffon, 15 rue Hélène Brion, 75013 Paris, entrée libre

samedi 17 mars 2012

2nd International Conference on Technical Communication

Web sémantique et ergonomie

Les problématiques abordées concernant le Web sémantique porteront sur ses apports, les enjeux et les perspectives offerts à la communication technique.

Il sera aussi question des nouvelles frontières de l’ergonomie : la multiplication des contenus numériques (livres, tablettes) constitue un nouveau défi dans le domaine de l’expérience utilisateur. Comment les ergonomes et les communicateurs techniques y répondent-ils ?

9h30 – 10h Accueil des intervenants et des participants

10h-10h30 Ouverture du Colloque : La recherche de plein champ à Paris Diderot [PDF]

Patricia Minacori, Directrice du Département professionnalisation, Paris Diderot

Ray Gallon, Président STC France

10h30–11h00 Les apprentis communicateurs techniques de Paris Diderot : les projets  de recherche

11h00–11h30 Web sémantique et représentation de la connaissance : une nouvelle proposition de valeur pour les communicateurs techniques [PDF]

Virginie Ahrens, User Technology Manager, IBM France, Professeur associé Paris Diderot

11h30-12h00 Application des principes du Web sémantique dans DITA (OASIS) : comment utiliser les métadonnées et pourquoi le rédacteur technique devrait s’en soucier ? [PDF]

Nolwenn Kerzreho , Professeur Associé, Université Rennes II

12h-13h30 Déjeuner

13h30-14h00 Standardisation des formats à l’épreuve des nouveaux media : situation et enjeux

Thierry Stoehr, Université Paris Diderot

14h00-14h30 Expérience utilisateur et innovation technologique : utilisateur-modèle/ utilisateur-concret [PDF]

Béatrice Drot-Delange, Dacia Dressen-Hammouda, Laboratoire ACTé (EA4281), Clermont Université, Université Blaise Pascal

14h30-15h00 Nouveaux usages dans la documentation et l’aide aux utilisateurs : le cas de la notice de montage [PDF]

Laurent Bidoia (Société Affordance), Anthony Loiselet (Société A+B)

15h00-15h30 Nouvelles applications tactiles, sensorielles, intuitives : que reste-t-il à expliquer ?

Yves Rinato (intactile DESIGN)

15h30-16h00 Débats

1st International Conference on Technical Communication – Technical communication and user experience (2011)

1st International Conference on Technical Communication

Technical communication and user experience

Le laboratoire de recherche CLILLAC-ARP, de l’Université de Paris Diderot, en association avec le Bureau de Paris de la STC (Society for Technical Communication) sont heureux de vous inviter à participer à un séminaire sur la communication technique le Samedi 26 mars à l’Université Paris Diderot.
Thèmes du séminaire
  • ergonomie des documents,
  • web sémantique,
  • e-learning,
  • stratégie de contenu,
  • architecture de l’information

10h-10h30 Ouverture du séminaire

  • Patricia Minacori, Directrice Département professionnalisation, Paris Diderot : La recherche de plein champ à Paris Diderot
  • Ray Gallon, Président STC France : La STC et la recherche
  • Les apprentis communicateurs techniques de Paris Diderot : les projets de recherche.

10h30–11h00 Comment intégrer la communication visuelle et interactive dans la communication technique ?
Bruno Wagner, Communicateur technique, SKF

11h00–11h30 Design et communication technique
Raya Hristova, Elodie Dionisio Gomes, Esteban Villate, Etudiants M2 CDMM, Paris Diderot

11h30-12h00 Prendre en compte l’utilisateur pour concevoir des documents procéduraux adaptés : une approche de psychologie cognitive ergonomique
Franck Ganier, maître de conférences, Université de Bretagne Occidentale Brest

12h-12h30 Ergonomie de l’avertissement
Marie Louise Flacke, Information Developer, Chargée de cours Université de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest

12h30-13h30 Déjeuner

13h30-14h00 Le Lego ® du contenu
Marie Girard, Communicateur Technique IBM France

14h00-14h30 Voyage dans le contenu: créer son modèle d’information
Virginie Ahrens, Directeur Senior Département ILOG User Technologies, IBM France

14h30-15h00 Ontologies et recherche d’informations dans le domaine scientifique
Claire Nédélec, Chercheur INRA

15h00-15h30 Developing Content for the International Marketplace
Patrick Aubry, Lloyd International Translations

15h30-16h00 Les agents conversationnels
Charlotte Levenès, Virtuoz