Information Processing and Technical Writing: The Importance of Optimizing Users’ Working Memory

Mélanie PIERRE, Amélie CARON, Coline MAGNIER, Margaux ZANINI

Paris Diderot University, July 15, 2021

Abstract

The simpler the better, you have probably heard this sentence many times. It is  particularly true in technical writing. It has been proven that having more than seven chunks  of information or using useless information in a technical document can affect users working memory as well as an unstructured document. However, there is little research on the nature of the link between working memory and technical writing.
Our article examines the correlation between cognitive psychology and technical writing and more especially the importance of optimizing the user’s working memory when writing technical documents. To understand the impact of an altered procedure on the realization of a task, we conducted an experiment which consisted of a comparison between two drawing procedures: one which aimed at optimizing working memory and the other which aimed at altering it. Participants shared their drawings and told us the difficulties they faced for eachof the procedures.

Our research and the analysis of the conducted experiment allowed us to draw the conclusion that technical writers should always consider their user’s working memory to ensure that the instructions are easy to follow for every age and capacity range. The structure and content of documentations can help users to group information together and thus help improve their working memory while reading instructions.

Read the full article in PDF: Information processing and technical writing

The adaptation of e-learning to the learner’s preferences: What are the benefits and the limitations of personalized e-learning environments?

Inès Lavandier, Julie Jacquelin and Héloïse Huet

July 2021

Abstract

This study explores the personalization of e-learning environments. The main
question we would like to answer in this research article is: What are the benefits and the limitations of personalized e-learning environments? This question encompasses both ends of the spectrum. The results of our research suggest that personalized e-learning environments should provide a better learning experience because it encapsulates the learner’s preferred methods of learning. While traditional e-learning focuses on mass-learning, standard methods with few variations and interactions, the personalization of e-learning should facilitate knowledge retention and be more user-centric.

Read the full article in PDF: The adaptation of e-learning to the learners preferences

Action in E-learning

Clothilde BASCOU, Tingting JIANG, Sofia MOISEYEV, Adeline RITO

Paris Diderot University, July 14th, 2021

Abstract

To have a qualified workforce, companies invest in new digital strategies to develop their employees’ skills. The effectiveness of the training content is at the heart of their concerns. Contractors sell them interactive training content with the argument that it is indeed effective for knowledge retention and skills development. But companies need to know the validity of that argument to invest in the right direction.
This research evaluates the impact of action in e-learning processes on the effectiveness of online training. The data was collected through the completion of two e-learning modules (action-oriented and actionless), and surveys. Kirkpatrick’s training evaluation model was used to measure the results.
The study results suggest that the effectiveness of e-learning can be improved through the use of neurosciences, personification of training, application of e-doing, eye tracking and social learning.

Read the full article in PDF: Action in E-learning